Saturday, February 6, 2010

What to Do With Conversation Hearts



Math:
* Graph your conversation hearts based on how many you get of each color. See the following links:

Here is a link to a printable conversation hearts graph. It is the 4th link down on the list. Double click. Click open. Print and use!

From ABC Schoolhouse, here are 15 pages worth of printable Valentine ideas. Including, on page 7 a printable graph for conversation hearts.
* Have the students sort the hearts based on colors and phrases. Make predictions ahead of time and see who comes the closest to their guess.

If you don't want to print out a graph, Grandma Lizzie's house has a variety to the graphing idea, but still the same concept.


* Create a pattern. Can be glued onto construction paper in the shape of a heart.

Literacy:
* Have the students make stories or write sentences based on what phrases they find on their hearts.

Cooking:
* Make your own conversation heart cookies. Make sugar cookies and use a heart cookie cutter. Once the cookies are baked, frost them and write your own special message.
* If you really feel like going all out this year, why not make your own conversation hearts? Learn how at About.com.



Is there anything fun YOU like to do using conversation hearts?

* Cathy BB added: A super-easy and fun game for kids is to have them simply stack the hearts and see how many they can stack before it falls over (counting, fine motor skills, etc). When I did this with my son's third-grade class, they really thought it was a blast.

3 comments:

Katie's Journey said...

The conversation hearts are great for a writing assignment too. We did that in one of my education classes last year. We wrote a letter to our valentine and used the conversation hearts as part of our sentences. They turned out really cute!

Room Mom 101 said...

Thanks for the addition to the idea! I love to hear how others do things too. Sounds fun.

CathyBB said...

Hi there! A super-easy and fun game for kids is to have them simply stack the hearts and see how many they can stack before it falls over (counting, fine motor skills, etc). When I did this with my son's third-grade class, they really thought it was a blast. =)